Josh Allen is drawing rave reviews in his first practices with the Buffalo Bills

Ryan Gates, a radio producer for WGR 550 in Buffalo, promised in March he would leave the station if the team drafted Allen with Baker Mayfield or Josh Rosen still available.

The tweet came four days after the Bills traded Tyrod Taylor to the Cleveland Browns, leaving Nathan Peterman as the only quarterback on the roster. A day after Gates’ tweet, Buffalo signed AJ McCarron, the team’s likely starter for Week 1.

I’m joining the corporate world. I am a man of my word and it is because of Josh Allen.

Last week, Browns coach Hue Jackson followed through on a promise to jump into Lake Erie for somehow not improving a 1-15 team. In April, a Cleveland radio host said he’d eat horse poop if the Browns drafted Baker Mayfield — something he still hasn’t done and really shouldn’t. Just don’t eat poop, please.

But a career change might be the most significant promise we’ve seen someone follow through on. You have to respect Gates’ integrity, but the moral of the story here is to stop making sports guarantees, especially ones involving the NFL Draft.

The workout bonus is some offseason cash kicked over to the player if he meets a minimum attendance percentage for the voluntary offseason program (anywhere from 70 to 85 percent, depending on the team’s requirements).

The history behind the workout bonus, as I recall, is that in the old days, players held jobs elsewhere in the offseason. The workout bonus came about as a way to compensate those who wanted to devote themselves to their craft by working out at the team’s facility.

To be clear, the offseason program is voluntary and teams cannot force players to attend the workouts. Those who do meet a certain attendance requirement become eligible for their workout bonuses, which are typically paid out at the end of June.

Those who do not meet the requirement and hence do not collect their workout bonuses end up generating a cap credit for their team.

They can include a roster bonus paid to the player if he’s still on the roster by a certain date (usually no later than the fifth day of the new league year or if he makes the 53-man roster coming out of training camp); a per-game roster bonus (a typical clause given to a player with an injury history in which the player is compensated for each game he’s on the active 46-man game-day roster), and performance incentives which break down into likely to be earned (LTBE) and not likely to be earned (NLTBE).

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